Events

Stateside Presents
Against Me!, Bleached, The Dirty Nil
with Against Me!, Bleached, The Dirty Nil
Rock Alternative Alternative
September 17, 2017 8:00 pm
All Ages
$22.50 - $37.00
Against Me!
Rock

Laura Jane Grace - vocals/guitar // James Bowman - guitar/vocals // Inge Johansson - bass // Atom Willard - drums

 

Four years is a measurement of time that America has used for centuries to indicate change. Presidential terms last four years; high school diplomas and college degrees typically take four years apiece, too. It’s not an arbitrary thing, either: It typically takes that much time from the declaration of something changing for it to actually change.

Meet Laura Jane Grace. Four years ago, the Against Me! frontwoman came out as transgender; 18 months later, she released the band’s sixth album, the fiery Transgender Dysphoria Blues, one which she began working on before her transition and helped document the struggles she was facing. It was an intensely personal record that took on a life of its own, connecting with thousands of new listeners drawn to Grace’s honesty and complexity while still pleasing Against Me!’s dedicated fanbase.

Now, four years after Grace’s public reintroduction, Against Me! is ready to release their new album, Shape Shift With Me, September 16 on Total Treble. While much has changed in the lives of Grace and her bandmates—guitarist James Bowman, bassist Inge Johansson and drummer Atom Willard—in that time period, it’s clear that those intervening years have done wonders for creativity.

“Everything with Shape Shift With Me has been really about keeping momentum going,” she says. “In between every tour we did for Transgender Dysphoria Blues, I would have a couple songs I had written and we would demo them. At the end of two years of touring, we had an album ready to record. Usually, you come off of touring for a record and you're back at square one. But this was so fully formed it felt like there was no choice but to go ahead and record the songs.”

Shape Shift With Me has the distinction of the first album Grace has written truly from the heart, with no metaphorical cloaks cast over the lyrics. It’s an album about love, that deceptively complex emotion we all struggle with yet has somehow eluded most of Grace’s songwriting for the past 20 years.

“Tons of people have written about love. But while love is cliché, it’s infinitely relevant. For me, having always been in a punk band that was expected to be political, I never felt like I had that option to write about feelings in that way. That’s what I ended up being drawn to this time. It’s writing in a way I thought I could never write before, and not giving a shit about expectations.

As such, Shape Shift With Me is a loose concept album about traveling the world and falling in and out of love, with Grace serving as the narrator. But even though she was opening herself up to new songwriting topics, she knew what her mission was from the start.

“Is there a record that is about relationships from a trans perspective?” she asks rhetorically. “There needs to be more records about trans rights and everything like that, but feeling like I already did that, I wanted to move on to write commentary on living from a trans perspective. I wanted to write the transgender response to the Rolling Stones’ Exile On Main St., Liz Phair’s Exile In Guyville and the Streets’ A Grand Don’t Come For Free. All those records are relationship records. There’s been an infinite amount of records talking about what love means from a cisgender perspective. I wanted to present the trans perspective on sex, love and heartbreak.”

With Grace’s new motivation came a new outlook on the band, as well. Previous albums found the songwriting process to be a largely solitary experience, but she embraced the spirit of collaboration for Shape Shift With Me—so much so that when Cody Votolato of the Blood Brothers sent her some demos of songs he was working on for another project, she became inspired and ended up co-writing “Boyfriend” and “Norse Truth,” two of the album’s most memorable tracks, with him.

“It was just about opening up to whatever comes my way karmically,” Grace says. “Whatever everyone in the band is willing to offer, I just wanted to be open to it. I didn’t want it to be like what it was in the past where it may have felt closed. I want it to be different.”

In a career already full of classic punk records, Shape Shift With Me feels like the definitive Against Me! album—it’s poppy and catchy (“Rebecca,” “Suicide Bomber”), aggressive and in-your-face (“ProVision L-3,” “Dead Rats”), sentimental and longing (“Crash,” “All This And More”). Moreover, it’s the culmination of four years of existence as Laura Jane Grace—there’s no going back now, so she might as well embrace it.

“While I’ve always wanted the moon and the stars, I have a certain amount of humbleness,” she admits. “I just want to play shows and make records and write songs. That’s what I’ve always wanted to do. Of course I always want the biggest and best things for those shows and records and songs, but when it comes down to it, I just love doing it. I have no other ambitions or career goals.

“David Bowie put out 27 full-lengths. Prince put out 39 full-lengths,” Grace remarks. “That is so inspiring to me—working, creating art, creating records and let everyone else sort it out. That’s what I’ve always wanted to do and that’s what I will keep on doing.”

Bleached
Alternative

“What I really resent most about people sticking labels on you is that it cuts off all the other elements of what you are because it can only deal with black and white...” Siouxie Sioux

I have been playing in bands since I was 16 years old. When we were 15, my sister Jessica and I started going to punk shows every weekend in LA to see the likes of the Adolescents, the Dickies, X, TSOL. We were obsessed with the Slits, Blondie, Siouxie and the Banshees. One weekend we went to see F Minus at the Glasshouse. It was during their set when Jessie and I decided to start a band. That week we learned to play guitar and have been playing punk music since. Currently I am the singer, one of the guitar players, and songwriter for Bleached, a punk band from the San Fernando Valley. We are releasing a new EP on March 3, 2016 titled Can You Deal? After 5 straight months of touring, there was an energy in our band playing together that we wanted to try and capture in the studio. We recorded these songs in a 3 week break from touring when we felt like we needed to keep moving. After spending months working on the last record, we wanted to go back to the process of recording quickly, capturing the energy we were experiencing on stage. Alex Newport produced and mixed them with us. The songs are raw. The recordings are too. Just how we wanted them.

Last year we released a full length album titled Welcome The Worms which was a deeply personal record. It was a record about being in and getting out of an emotionally abusive relationship. It was a record about getting spun out on drugs and alcohol. It was a record about totally losing myself in order to find myself. It was also our most ambitious body of work yet, with guitar work and guitar sounds and production we had only dreamed of until then. And yet to this day I am still fielding interview questions that have more to do with my gender than with the art I am creating. Somehow the conversation usually derails into some variation of the following question: "What is it like to be a girl in a rock band?" What does one want from this question? It is a lazy question, is it not? What does me being in a band have to do with my gender? The question is asked with a feigned surprise that women can play well, play loud, make records, and tour as if it has not been happening for years. There is a sense of novelty to a girl playing guitar and making rock music. There is an element of surprise that we are females and being interviewed about the music we make...as women.

Here is my answer to your question. Being girl in a band is no different than being a girl in any field. We have people consistently pointing out our gender as if it relates to our ability to do our job. Our gender is pointed out in nearly all coverage of what we do as if it was integral to understanding our band. Labeling me as a woman in a band just puts me in a box, and doesn’t allow everything else I am to be seen and heard. My band is labeled as a “girl band” or a “female fronted” band. Why the necessity to differentiate? Is it a warning? Women have been playing rock music for decades. When does the novelty wear off? The labeling is reductive. And does not (and has not) done us any favors. When can my band simply be labeled as “a punk band”?

I create music and art because I need to. To express, to bond, to reconcile, and to connect. And to use my voice. To have it received with such a generic filter and off hand labeling is insulting. The title track to this EP, “Can You Deal?” is about this experience. “You know that it’s me, Who Else Could I Be? Don’t You See?”

Can You Deal? is for every girl out there who is sick of every male sound engineer telling them what they think is right for their set up. Can You Deal? is for every girl who has been told that "girl bands are in right now" by an A&R guy. Can You Deal? is for any girl mulling over press photos knowing their band will be picked apart before someone even listens to the music. Can You Deal? is for everyone who can stop referring to my band as “female fronted”. It is for everyone who can stop feigning surprise every time a woman plugs in and plays well, or gets behind the drums, or has the sickest bass style. It is 2017. Can You Deal Yet? I look forward to speaking to you about the music.

-Jennifer Clavin, Bleached

The Dirty Nil
Alternative